Pills, Thrills and Pharmacy Spills

I am very late in writing this post and I have to apologise to Mr Dispenser for being so tardy, but I just wanted to let you know about a fantastic book about pharmacy that has just come out. This book was written by Mr Dispenser, who is, if you read his book clearly not your average pharmacist as in his spare time (!!!) he has been collecting funny anecdotes from pharmacists around the UK (and I suspect further afield) as well as documenting his own experiences of pharmacy life. The book is called Pills, Thrills and Methadone Spills and you can download it as an e-book from Amazon or a paper back versioncover_v13

This book had me chuckling constantly (I have to admit mostly at the silly things patients say as I am often one of those patients). Also, for me this has been the most fun way to learn about pharmacy life and the things that might be on pharmacist’s minds – I love academic papers, but how nice to learn in such an engaging way. I have no doubt I will be referencing it in my thesis (especially the chapter titled “The missing prescription” – which is a lovely narrative of the mistakes that are made by several people at the same time and the devil that is confirmation bias).

This isn’t a book aimed at academia (although for all those working in pharmacy practice research and teaching it is a fabulous resource) what Mr Dispenser has achieved through his blog, and now this fantastic book is a dialogue between pharmacists all around the world – and that is amazing. You can follow Mr Dispenser’s blog or on twitter:@mrdispenser for many more funny stories from the pharmacy world. Great job Mr D!

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Recruitment update for pharmacy student study

This week I re-started the recruitment and testing for our pharmacy student study. I had to pause recruitment and testing for this study for the whole of December and January whilst the students were away for their Christmas holidays and then the exam period in the new year. So I was well and truly ready to get stuck back in to the data collection. I can’t wait till I’ve completed the first study so that we can run our analyses and see what is happening.

The good news is I made a very good start in this first week as I managed to test six students. I have got another 4 booked in this week and then a couple for the following week. However, frustratingly I need about another 20 people to sign up and I am struggling to get there. My posters, visits to lectures and 2 recruitment e-mails have only pulled in those 12 or so participants, I have one e-mail reminder left and then I am not sure what I am going to do next to get students participating in my study other than relying on the snowball effect from now on.

I now know I have chosen a difficult group to study and I am starting to understand why the researchers whose work I am trying to replicate and extend used psychology undergraduates, not pharmacy undergraduates. The advantage to using Psychology students for research is they have to take part in experiments to gain course credits – so you have a captive audience. When I did my psychology degree we all had to do 10hrs research participation every term for 3 years mostly taking part in post-grads research. So in total those postgrads got 90hrs of my time! For free! Pharmacy students dont have to take part in research and are not used to being invited to take part in research either. Plus pharmacy students have a huge work load (especially compared to psychology students) so it does not surprise me that I am struggling to get loads of volunteers.

However this study is important and just because a population is hard to reach/engage it doesn’t mean you should not involve them in research – in fact not to do so leads to biased research in any given area. So I will keep going! I have one last hope that this term I help teach on the health psychology module to my target participants and so maybe seeing me once a week for the next few months will help me keep my project in their minds and maybe they will eventually sign up.

Having had a mini rant I must also add that I have been so pleased to meet everyone who has taken part so far. They have all been lovely and enthusiastic and have had lots of helpful insights into the real world application of my research. More than that, having met them all I am super impressed with all these soon to be pharmacists that the University of Bath are producing. I am not saying this because it is the corporate line, I honestly can’t sing their praises enough when I compare myself to them at their age I had no clue how to act professionally and yet they are becoming true professionals already. Plus their knowledge on medicines is immense. It is very impressive.

I hope to bring you lots of positive recruitment updates over the next few weeks and fingers crossed I may even reach my targets soon.

P.s. I’ve updated my recruitment syringe on the homepage as I’ve now tested 30 participants in total!

RPS Responsible Pharmacist Symposium 26/01/2012

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Jane and I were invited to the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) in London to attend a symposium about the responsible pharmacist regulations. It was organised by Martin Astbury (President of the RPS) and his colleagues and chaired by Catherine Duggan, Director of Professional Development and Support at the RPS. Both Jane and I were very excited to be invited and the day was even more interesting than the programme had promised. Originally billed as a discussion of the responsible pharmacist regulations it quickly led into discussions about the idea of developing a just culture in pharmacy.

In proposing this idea Martin Astbury and Catherine Duggan are breaking new ground in pharmacy practice as discussions in the literature have focused on a more general definition of safety culture. They also invited representatives from other industries e.g. Sean Parker from the Civil Aviation Authority to talk about how the just culture works in the aviation industry. Sean spoke about how the aerospace industry has been working towards a “just culture” and about their successes and failures in terms of safety management. This was very exciting for Jane and I as our mental workload research is based on research from the aerospace industry and we feel that there is a lot of ideas and measures that can be applied in pharmacy practice. What a relief to know that we have been working along the correct lines the last couple of years and that the professional body as a whole is now also considering what can be learnt from this industry.

For me, as a young researcher to be able to meet so many big names in the pharmacy practice world was very exciting. I have yet to perfect my networking skills so I was also very nervous the whole day, but the other conference delegates kindly listened to my ideas and thoughts when we broke up into small groups to discuss how a just culture could work for pharmacy. There were many great view points and it was clear that each sector of pharmacy perceived different barriers to the development of this culture. The overall biggest one was how pharmacy sits within the wider health care services, and is it possible for pharmacy to develop a new culture when they are also embedded in the culture of the NHS and their respective trusts, or communities?

Overall for me, I was just thrilled to be invited to the very first discussion and meeting about this potential shift in pharmacy culture, especially as it fits so nicely with our research. There will be a lot more work and discussion within the profession before anything is decided or done, so I will keep updating this page with news and information as I get it.

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